Lazy Early Riser Soaked Bread

Lazy Early Riser Soaked Bread
I’m just going to come out and say it.
I have been fighting with bread for all of my adult life.

 There were many dare I say, barely edible loaves when I first ventured into bread making on my own. Once I got past that stage, for months at a time everything will be butterflies and rainbows then out of the blue I will have a string of terrible failed loaves.
Add in a few, ok lots, of moves and all sorts of different ovens and I’ve had my fair share of frustration and trail and error learning.
 
Through all of that I’ve come to realize a few things.
 Bread is simply flour, a leavener, water and time. 
Everything else is optional.
 All the different techniques and ingredients are to give specific different loaves; but its all bread folks. 
Just cause your loaf didn’t turn out as you dreamed it would doesn’t mean it’s any less bread! 
Bread making is a craft, an art form and you gotta be willing to eat a few ugly deformed loaves along the way to your dream bread. 
Right now in my “bread journey” I’m just wanting to not buy any premade bread. I want to make all of our own bread so I needed a basic, un-needy ( no pun intended!) loaf that would be happy to dunk its self in soup, become a sandwich and still be good with just a lather of butter on top.
Oh bread and butter, how I love thee!
anyway….

I sort of messed around with some recipes I know work and this overnight, minimal work, soaked recipe was born. This recipe yields a dense, hearty moist bread that is ready for anything.

Lazy Early Riser Soaked Bread

Why overnight and why soaked you ask?

Two reasons: letting is hang out builds the gluten fibers in the bread the same as kneading does but without, you know, the work. The overnight rest also allows the enzymes in the flour, the yeast and the starter culture to break down nutrient binding compounds in the bread that can interfere with mineral absorption and protein digestion. Essentially all grains, seeds and legumes have these compounds to a greater or lesser degree.
While eating unsoaked bread isn’t going to kill you, soaking it makes it more nutritious.  Considering that lots of us are mineral deficient its a great practice to get into. 

Since I have a toaster oven I divide this into two small loaves. If I didn’t do that it would rise so much it would be stuck to the ceiling of the oven, the many joys of toaster oven baking! Don’t get me wrong, I am so thankful to have any oven all but I will be a happy happy women the day I have a real full size oven again. You can read more about where we live here
Alrigth, I’m blabbered out, let’s get down to business.
Lazy Early Riser Soaked Bread

 

Lazy Early Riser Soaked Bread

2 cups whole wheat flour
1 cup all-purpose flour
2 tsp yeast
1 tsp salt
starter culture ~ a couple table spoons of unpasteurized vinegar, yogurt or liquid from a fermented food. What ever you use, it needs to not have been heated in any way that could have killed the bacteria. Pasteurized, canned or cooked won’t work.

Alterations:

~Sourdough loaf~

To use a sourdough starter simple substitute a cup of starter for a cup of warm water. Everything else is the same. 
~quicky loaf~
You can omit the overnight soak and the recipe will still work. BUT you will have to knead and knead and knead! Between every rise and the flavor won’t be the same and you won’t get the nutritional benefits. 
~ Flour~
Yes, you can change the flour up, as long as its wheat flour! I’ve no experience with gluten free bread, sorry you are on your own there! 

 
Lazy Early Riser Soaked Bread: ingredients Lazy Early Riser Soaked Bread: proofed yeast


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Stir your flour and salt together.  Proof your yeast.  Measure your yeast into a bowl then add comfortably warm water to it and the bacteria culture starter. Let it set and get bubbly. Get yourself a spoon and stir in the liquid. Keep adding warm water and stirring until you get a wet elastic dough. Make sure to work out any flour lumps with the back of the spoon against the side of the bowl.  

 

Now cover it with a floured towel, pan lid or plate- I don’t know about you but I’m trying to wean myself off plastic wrap. Let it set overnight or at least 8 hours. You could leave it longer but it will start to get sourdough flavors so if you aren’t into that kind of thing don’t leave it too long.
At some point in the early morning hours on a trip to the bathroom or when you get up, you will find that it’s doubled. Just stir it down and flop it around in the bowl a few times before covering it back up and going about your business.

After it’s first mixed

Lazy Early Riser Soaked Bread: the doughLazy Early Riser Soaked Bread: the dough

8 hour raise & soak

 Lazy Early Riser Soaked Bread: overnight rise and soak

After 8 hour raise & soak

Lazy Early Riser Soaked Bread: in the morningLazy Early Riser Soaked Bread: getting some gluten fibers going

“Punch down” & raise

Lazy Early Riser Soaked Bread: perfect!Lazy Early Riser Soaked Bread: rising again

Forming loaves

Lazy Early Riser Soaked Bread: flour to get it out of the bowlLazy Early Riser Soaked Bread: about to kneadLazy Early Riser Soaked Bread: kneaded dough

  When it’s doubled again you knead it for the first time.
To get the dough out of the bowl I sprinkle a thick layer of flour on top and work it down around the edges. The flour keeps it from sticking to me or back on the bowl, then I just flop it out on the counter.  I don’t knead for very long really. Just until it’s holding together and elastic. Add flour freely, the dough starts out wet so it can suck up a lot of flour. Now you can shape the dough into loaves for baking. 

 
Lazy Early Riser Soaked Bread: dividing Lazy Early Riser Soaked Bread: shaping

 

 

 

 

 

 

To shape, I punch the dough down and knead just until it forms a nice ball. Then I divide the ball in half and shape each half into a log by rolling it back and forth on a surface. You have to strike the right balance between floured and sticky to make the log elongate. If you have a different method for shaping or want another shape of loaf by all means have at it! Spray the loaves down so the dough doesn’t dry out and let it double again. 

Lazy Early Riser Soaked Bread: final riseLazy Early Riser Soaked Bread; about to go in the oven

 
Lazy Early Riser Soaked Bread; time to eat!

Once its risen preheat the oven to 400°F. When it’s to temperature spray the loaves down again, put them in the oven and turn the heat up to 425°F. The water helps prevent the crust from setting prematurely so the bread can rise as much as possible. When it starts to pull away from the pan and sounds hollow it’s done. As usual I don’t give an exact baking time since its going to be different in every oven and pan, but it’s around thirty minutes. 
Now, what to eat on your warm moist, straight-from-the-oven bread? 
Um, everything and anything! 
But to start you off, why not some lemon curd, jam, fruit butter or make it into a homegrown egg sandwich? 
I’m just going to leave you alone with your bread now, enjoy!

Lazy Early Riser Soaked Bread: no sugar, dairy or egg needed!

This post is participating in the Homestead Barn, Real Food Wednesday, HomeAcre, From The Farm and Mostly Homemade Mondays blog hops, check them out to find other great blogs like ours!

Lazy Early Riser Soaked Breas
A simple soaked bread recipe with little kneading. No added sugar, egg or diary needed.
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Prep Time
20 hr
Cook Time
30 min
Prep Time
20 hr
Cook Time
30 min
1391 calories
289 g
0 g
4 g
42 g
1 g
626 g
2379 g
1 g
0 g
3 g
Nutrition Facts
Serving Size
626g
Amount Per Serving
Calories 1391
Calories from Fat 36
% Daily Value *
Total Fat 4g
7%
Saturated Fat 1g
3%
Trans Fat 0g
Polyunsaturated Fat 2g
Monounsaturated Fat 1g
Cholesterol 0mg
0%
Sodium 2379mg
99%
Total Carbohydrates 289g
96%
Dietary Fiber 12g
49%
Sugars 1g
Protein 42g
Vitamin A
0%
Vitamin C
0%
Calcium
7%
Iron
25%
* Percent Daily Values are based on a 2,000 calorie diet. Your Daily Values may be higher or lower depending on your calorie needs.
Ingredients
  1. 2 cups whole wheat flour
  2. 1 cup all-purpose flour
  3. 2 tsp yeast
  4. 1 tsp salt
  5. 1 cup warm water +plus more if dough is not wet enough
  6. starter culture ~ a couple table spoons of unpasteurized vinegar, yogurt or liquid from a fermented food
Instructions
  1. 1-Stir flour and salt together
  2. 2-Add yeast to small bowl with cup warm water and bacterial culture, let set until bubbly
  3. 3- Add yeast mixture to flour mixture and stir together with spoon until all lumps are worked out. If needed add more warm water to make extra wet dough.
  4. 4-Cover bowl and let set at least 8 hours
  5. 5-Stir and flop dough around with spoon to push air out of it
  6. 6-Cover and let rise until doubled
  7. 7-sprinkle heavy layer of flour on top of dough and use your hand or a utensil to scoop it out onto a floured counter.
  8. 8- knead just until it comes together to form an elastic ball
  9. 9- shape into baking pans and let rise until doubled.
  10. 10-preheat oven to 400F
  11. 11- spray loaves with water
  12. 12- put loaves in oven and turn temperature up to 425F
  13. 13- spray loaves with water once more while in oven.
  14. 14- Bake bread for about 30 minutes, until it sounds hollow and starts to pull away from pan.
Notes
  1. ~sourdough loaf~
  2. To use a sourdough starter simple substitute a cup of starter for a cup of warm water. Everything else is the same.
  3. ~quicky loaf~
  4. You can omit the overnight soak and the recipe will still work. BUT you will have to knead and knead and knead! Between every rise and the flavor won’t be the same and you won’t get the nutritional benefits.
beta
calories
1391
fat
4g
protein
42g
carbs
289g
more
Life From Scratch http://itslifefromscratch.com/
 

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